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Missing Just House Vol. Ocho y Media A la Hora Sigue! Terminal 11 feat. Headhunter Are We Mindless? Singing Melody Feat. A-Studio S. Bellatrax feat. Undoubtedly the clearing of the woods and the cultivation of the soil have wrought climatic changes. Since civilization came the winters have not been as severe and there has not been as much humidity in the air as when the land was covered with forests.

The sinuosities of the several isothermals demonstrate the peculiarities of Michigan climate which are largely attributed to the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan has great influence upon the climate of Grand Rapids and the comfort of its citizens. In July the deflection of the isothermal of Grand Rapids illustrates the cooling influence of Lake Michigan.

The loops of the isothermals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan opening southward show that the summer temperature of the interior is much. The sttiffimner isothermal is marked and in slightly higher than Ohicago and about the same as Clev-elanad, Ohio. It will be noticed that in:f 4anuary there is an exces8 of warminig influence along the eastern side of Lake Mtichigan which contiinues until surn met. The growing season is also -from twelve to, twenty days longer on the east shore than it 'is on the west shore.

Durinig the summer Lake Michigan cools the atmosphere of Grand Rapids, during the winter it modifies the weather of Grand Rapids. In summer the water of the lake will average about and in the winter about Winds from the lake partaking largely of the temperature of the water exert a material influence upon Grand Rapids which ameliorates extremes of weather and tends to prevent sudden changes.

The comparative mild temperature of the water of Lake Michigan during the cold season is largely due to its great depth. The waters of the lake reach down nearly eight hundred feet toward' the internal fires of the earth. The same distande through the solid crust of the earth would bring considerable increase of warmth. By that ratio the temperature -at the bottom of Lake Mliehigan would be increased eighteen degrees.

The amount of internal heat disttrlbilted through the entire body of waiter in the lake undoubtedly produces a co-nsAiderable elevration of temperatuire ini the genferal mass. The records of the weather for each winter have been care. In prehistoric times extinct animals of great size roamed the Grand River Valley. In in marsh ground on the farm of Aaron Hills, near Alpine Station, were found the remains of a mammoth or mastodon. There were ribs, portions of the. One rib was four feet long; one section of the vertebrae was nearly two feet long, and some of the teeth weighed over three and a half pounds each.

In on the farm of John Considin, in Byron township, were found the remains of tusks of a prehistoric animal which weighed nearly thirty pounds each. Recent investigations by ethnologists and archeologists have evolved a theory generally accepted by scholars that the Indians, Moundbuilders, Mexicans.

Perhaps they were slightly changed and influenced in prehistoric times by racial injections from Europe and Eastern Asia, but they essentially ever remained one race and one people. In an ethnological sense America is not new, but old. Ages before the foundations of the Egyptian pyramids and the hanging gardens of Babylon were laid there were flourishing cities and an advanced civilization in Central America.

At that time all of British America and much of the United States was covered with a glacier, which year by year receded. Primitive man, like civilized man, was migratory. As the ice receded and the climate became more temperate in North America man moved north. His pathway is marked with ruins of cities, petroglyphs, iconographs, hieroglyphs, cooking utensils, pottery, weapons, ornaments and mounds. He moved along the line of least resistance marked by the great forces of nature.

He reached the Great Lakes by the Gulf of Mexico, the Mississippi and the waterway which once flowed from the head of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi; when the earth was young he traversed the Great Lakes; he ascended the rivers of the lakes and explored their valleys; he visited Grand River Valley and stopped and left records and memiorabilia of his occupancy; he left mounds, the patterns of which.

It is now generally conceded by scholars that the Indians belong to the same ancient people as the Moundbuilders, the Aztecs and the Peruvians, and that all Americans had a comion origin. Ages before the coming of the white man the race had reached a high civilization in Central America, where the ruins of ancient cities show a higher civilization than any found by Europeans when America was discovered.

In succeeding hges the race degenerated. The identity of the Indians with their ancient progenitors is revealed by relics, mortuary customs, traditions, legends, linguistic similarities and primitive habits which have remained constant throughout the ages.

The race retained its culture longest in Mexico and Peru where the Spanish conquerors found an old civilization in decay, which was quickly overthrown by the white race. The ancient race had migrated northward from Central America and Mexico, and spread over the entire continent of North America. It engaged in constant warfare and lost its civilization, its arts, and its culture.

Existence for ages was a continued struggle with nature. Life could be sustained only by war and the chase. The art of building eminent structures was forgotten. Agriculture survived only in raising a little corn. Commerce and trade vanished. They sometimes lived in villages, but the fierce forces of nature reduced them to savages from what the race had been when ages before they lived in the South. Their fate was influenced by fierce upheavals of nature and stupendous terrestrial dislocations.

Undoubtedly there were accretions to the race from Europe and Asia centuries before the coming of Columbus, but the fiber of the race remained the same. There is a close affinity among the primitive, people of the earth, and the close relationship between the Aztecs, the Peruvians and thespeople who built cities in Central Anieriea and the early races of the old world has been often observed and remarked.

The calendar of the American aborigines resresembles that of savages in Africa and the. South Sea Islands, while the religious beliefs' adl cermionials oflthe American T diah are identical with those of Ikdia and China".. The sun danc'e of'the Indians is a relic of the sum, worship" of the Aatcs arid, the, ancient Peruvians, which in turn was much like the worshiP' of. The prehistorio races of Miehigan have left no witteti tevo6 but the rfpids of Grand Biter Were known to them and visited by them.

In one of these mounds was found a copper ornament which was a good imitation of the upper front teeth of a beaver. From the base of a mound in Court street were taken two nuggets of silver weighing about thirteen pounds and a copper nugget weighing about fourteen pounds. There were also found bone husking pegs, copper axes, ornaments in the shape of bear's teeth with holes drilled in them and other curiosities which were sold to the Peabody Museum of Salem, Massachusetts.

Below the city near the Lake Shore R. Concerning these mounds and other mounds about Grand Rapids a paper was, read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science at Detroit in of which the following is an extract: "Eight groups, containing forty-six mounds in all, were inspected, of which fourteen mounds were explored with great care. A typical group of seventeen, on the farm of Anson N. Norton, about three miles below the city on the South bank of the river, were surveyed and platted.

Those excavated and examined varied in altitude from two to fifteen and a half feet, and in diameter from ten to one hundred and two feet. All were more or less conical, somewhat flattened at the top, with a broad talus at the base; such a form as a conical mound of earth will naturally assume from long exposure. The material of the mounds seems in most cases to have been gathered from such an extent of surface about them as to leave no appreciable depression, and is uuailly of the same or similar alluvial soil.

Only in a few cases does there appear a mixture of the underlying gravels or clays, and generally it is evident that no great interval of time elapsed between the beginning and the completion of a mound. Trees are standing upon them as large as sone that have been. And more conclusive evidence of the great antiquity of the mound structures is found in the articles which many of them contain. Human bones are decomposed almost beyond recognition, and the same is true of the shafts of long bones of herbiferous animals, sometimes found there, so tender that they may be rubbed to powder between the fingers.

Copper is encrusted with a thicker coating of the carbonate than are pieces of that metal found at the depth of several feet in the heavy drift of the vicinity. Shells are in a friable condition, and wood, and bark and all fabrics are entirely decomposed. Nevertheless there is difference enough in this respect, in different cases, to suggest that all mounds of the same group are not coeval.

One mound in Ottawa county, removed years ago to smake way for a dock and mill, was described by those who leveled it as a pile of fish-bones, ashes and shells, at least fifteen feet high, forty-five feet wide and one hundred feet long. About one-third of the mounds examined were clearly places of sepulture. The use of the others, or the motive which led to their construction, can only be conjectured. They may have been monumental or commemorative, or erected as observatories, the latter being considered the least probable.

They were simply empty but structural piles of earth, mingled confusedly with those of the burial class, and not distinguishable from them by any external signs. Where there were no human remains there were no other relics, while in no case were there skeletons exhumed without finding something else of interest, and often several different kinds, such as stone, bone and copper implements, pottery, drinking vessels, and other articles.

Human remains found were almost invariably in an elongated concave, irregular oval pit, a foot or two below lhe natural surface of the grotnd, surrounded by whatever other objects of interest the mound contained. There is no i4niformity of posture in the positions of the skeletons; the feet are turned indifferently in any direction; often the limbs appear to have been forcibly fixed upon the body; still oftener the bobes are confusedly mingled.

Seldom is a complete skeleton in. Uusually the skull is flattened as if by the pressure of the soil in setting. Copper articles found appear as if they had been wrapped in coarse woven cloth, and in several instances, where the earth has been carefully cleared from bone, spears, flint implements, or even the common fragments of quartz pebbles, impressions of fabrics were clearly visible, such as might be made by slacktwisted threads of coarse, loosely woven cloth.

Shells were found, shaped apparently for carrying or storing water, in one case having holes near the edges, as if to hang by a cord or thong. Fragments of coarse pottery had markings as if shaped and baked or dried in a basket of rushes or coarse grass. Fragments of finer hollow ware were unique in appearance, the upper portion bearing marks as if made by revolving upon some kind of wheel, and the lower part being irregularly convex and having three or four strong protuberant knobs.

The rim is beveled or rounded at the edge, often ornamented with a cheek pattern apparently made by strokes diagonally of a pointed instrument. Below this is a plain band bordered by grooves, or rows of triangular pits, or both.

These vessels are small, having a capacity of not more than one or two quarts. Nothing of recent deposit was found in the Norton group of mounds; but in a mound on the farmn of Myron Roys, about a quarter of a nmile distant, were exhumed parts of a skeleton and a bed of charcoal. These were only about a foot beneath the surface. Nothing else was found here, except a few flint chips and a small copper needle, thickly coated with green oxide.

Another account of this "find" describes two pipes-one of nicely wrought green trap rock, the other "a finely carved piece of fossil coral. Lying just south of the Lake Shore bridge, back yards fronm the river, they are still in a reasonable state of preservation. The largest of them has a diameter of a hundred feet and a height of fifteen feet or more above the general surface. Close by are two of nearly equal size, in a line about feet apart, and all are very regular and conical in shape.

All are within an area of two and one half acres. Some bear on their tops trees that are two feet in diameter, and on others there are yet traces of still larger trees which have perished. Just in front of the group of mounds and approaching the river, can still be plainly discerned three sides of a rectangular wall, inclosing three or four acres, just a level embankment from a foot to a foot and a half in height.

On the side next the river this embankment has been worn or, more probably, plowed away, though there still remain traces of it where it joins the north and south side walls. Within this embankment, in front of it, and in fact all through the immediate vicinity there are numerous pieces of broken pottery and half baked clay, many flint arrowheads, an occasional bit of hardened copper and any number of other things of ancient mold and make.

In fact, the indications are that just here, within a few miles of the second city of Michigan, there once existed another city, not as large nor as populous, perhaps, but nevertheless as intense and earnest and emotional as any in our latter day civilization.

Why that city was not perpetuated is a question on which history remains silent, though the most reasonable supposition is that many years ago a warrior tribe from the north drove the inhabitants to the southward before their irresistible advance. In the smaller mounds which have been opened there were found the usual skeletons, placed in a circle with knees drawn up and hands clasped over them in front, the bits of broken pottery which had been buried with the man to whom they belonged.

Then, half way up toward the top of the mounds and over the heads of the skeletons were the usual rings of stones, on which fires had been built to destroy the scent of the bodies in case some prowling animal should invade the tomb. In the central mound which, incidentally, differs in radical fashion in its composition from the smaller ones surrounding it, there were found no skeletons.

This mound is built up of the richest portion of the surrounding alluvial soil, while the others were built from the gravel of the uplands. Ashes, charcoal, and. The presence of this mica, which is found, sometimes in large sheets, must usualy in countless smaller fragments, in a certain class of mounds throughout the central northern states, and in regions as remote from each other as are Michigan and Missouri, has called forth much speculation as to its use by the ancient inhabitants.

Some one has suggested that it may have been used for mirrors, or for ornaments. But when it is considered that the broken bits are found only in mounds of a certain type it may safely be conceded that the stuff was set apart for some certain use. There is a tradition, at least not improbable, considering the almost certain theory that these early residents of Grand Rapids were sun worshipers, that this central mound, as well as others like it throughout the country was used as an altar on which their sacred fire ignited from the heavens, was kept perpetually burning in honor of the sun-god who gave it life.

In view of this, it is entirely possible that the high priests of this ancient people were able in some manner to construct lenses from plates of mica of sufficient power to ignite the fuel upon the sacrificial altars, extinguished, so tradition continues, on the eve of the annual feast day of the tribe and rekindled the following morning by the sun himself, in the presence of a worshipful and awe-struck people.

It is related also, that the priests themselves, when dead, were buried in these same mounds after cremation, and certain it is that in the central mound of the group near here, charred remains of bones have been found which point unmistakably to the burial there of some body which had first been made the subject of attempt at burning.

In every case' in the other mounds, the bodies had been placed there and allowed to decay naturally. In some of these same mounds, also, were found skeletons of Indians who had been buried there at later dates, but there was no trouble in distinguishing them from the original tenant4. The body of the Indian was laid out straight and usually in one side of the mound. This was not altogether an uncommon thing in the earlier Indian days, for many traditions cogernW the mounds were current amjong the natives and they thet.

The original exploration of this group was done by the late Captain Coffinberry, assisted by Thomas Porter, and a large number of relics were rescued, the majority of which were placed in the collection of the Kent Scientific Institute, and now form a part of the Grand Rapids museum. A number of copper needles and a copper ax, eight inches long and four inches wide and quite smooth and perfect, were dug up, the latter going at once to a private collection in Chicago, where it still remains.

Several stone pipes and some marine shells which could only have come from the shore of the ocean itself were found, among the latter being two that are of exactly the same variety as is found along the coast of Florida, mute testimony to the spread of the tribe over the length and breadth of America. One of these shells has holes bored in its side through which a rope or string of hide had been inserted, and both were evidently used for drinking purposes or for carrying liquids.

One of the most interesting discoveries was of a number of handsome pots, some of which are at least fully equal to those of the bronze period in Europe. The art of the potter is so ancient and universal and the character and forms of the utensils made so important in the determination of relative periods in which the makers lived and of their civil advance and mental culture, that more interest attaches to relies of the ceramic art than to any other of the ordinary relics.

The specimens of pottery from the Grand Rapids mounds show a taste so artistic and a hand so skillful that they are scarcely less perfect in symmetry and lightness than the product of the potter's wheel. Even the coarser specimens are marked with straight or zig-zag lines, while others in their decorations give evidence of days of patient labor.

One of the pots found in the Norton mounds and now in the olal museum has a rim around the neck from which the vessel, afer a slight curve inward, swells into a bowl of uniform bulge. Most of the othep found differ in this however, the bowl which in each case is round bottomed, being divided into four equal bnlges, eaoh made mere m paetbaF t by a Smoth band, an inch wide, iurTouding it.

O0 each side are ornamented desigps,. A smooth band encircles the neck and the rim is adorned by crosslines or hatchings. It is said that these markings were all made with shells, and it is also asserted that the pots were all made by women. Coffinberry many years ago, and relics of various sorts found in nearly all. One was a boat-shaped piece which is thought to have been some part of a symbolic charm.

There is an ancient Indian myth to the effect that these were carried by the witch women, giving them the power to cross all waters with much the same facility that the witches of a more modern day flew through the air on broomsticks. On the rounded side of this relic is carved a figure which closely resembles the Egyptian scarab.

The piece itself is now in the Peabody museum at Harvard, sent there as a compromise after two Grand Rapids men had long disputed for its ownership and neither would let the other have it. The people who made those things, were well distinguished by traits of domestic economy and domestic relations from the Indian who was found in possession of the continent at the time of its European discovery.

Their monuments indicate that they had entered upon a career of actual civilization; they lived in stationary communities, tilling the soil and relying upon its generous yield as a means for support; they clothed themselves, in part at least, in garments regularly spun and woven; they modeled clay and carved stone; they mined and cast copper by methods which are the equal of any in vogue today; they quarried mica, slates and other rocks which they wrought into articles adapted to personal ornament, to domestic use, or to the chase; and finally, they had a well defined religion which, from the traces of it which remain in every part of the great plains, we may suppose to have been national.

It is a reasonable supposition, also,' that they had a national government as well. To attempt to trace the source from which they came would only involve the investigator in a maze of conjecture, and to trace their migration northward from Central America and. So why speculate about it? They lived. They are no more. I think of those Upon whose rest he tramples. Are they hereThe dead of other days?

And did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks Answer. A race that long has passed away Built them-a disciplined and populous race Heaped, with long toil, the earth, while yet the Greek Was heaving the Pentelicus to forms Of symmetry, and rearing on its rocks The glittering Parthenon The red man cameThe roaming hunter tribes, warlike and fierce, And the Moundbuilders vanished from the earth.

The solitude of centuries untold Has settled where they dwelt. Who knows what the future may bring forth? Perhaps the ruins of Grand Rapids may likewise be sometime visited by races yet unborn to whom the history and the events of the present age are unknown and to whom the traces and marks of our civilization and arts will be an enigma and a curiosity. When America was discovered they were found in all parts of the country.

They lived in the forest and depended upon the chase for subsistence. They were divided into several nations, which were subdivided into tribes and families, each having a local name, district, traditions and a separate dialect. They were a perfect type of primitive savages. When first visited by Europeans they doubtless numbered many thousands, but advanoing civilization has swept them away ntil now only a few remain to tell of their departed glories and repeat the legr ends of their ancestors.

When discovered by the white man Western Michigan was inhabited by the Chippewas, Pottawattamies and Ottawas. Lawrence, they had qrowsed the lake and taken possession of Lower Michigan. The three tribes were kindred in blood, in tradition, m language, in habits of life, and in general appearance.

They called themselves the three brothers, of whom the Chippewa tribe was the oldest, the Ottawa tribe second, while the Pottawattamies were the youngest. V Before the migration from Canada, Michigan was peopled by the Mish-ko-tink or Prairie Indians, who were a powerful tribe. There was a long and sanguinary war for the possession of the country. Tradition tells where many of the battles were fought.

There were three bloody battles on the banks of the Vernon anfd 'West F'ulton streets, in -which many were slaini, and which resulted in the coIA4 plete defeat of the Prairie Indians. The traditionf must be sioflie' thing more than a myth, because in that neighborhood human bones and implements of Indian warfare have often been found near the surface in promiscuous profusion. The final contest between the Prairie Indians and the invading tribes is said to have been fought near the mouth of the Marquette River.

Ia-Iving been defeated in every part of the country, the Prairie Indians retreated to the lake shore and awaited an opportunity of escape, when in the middle of the night they were surprised by the impetuous invaders. The battle was short but decisive. The Prairie Indians were completely annihilated. A few escaped from the hands of their bloodthirsty enemies, only to perish in the waters of the lake. The Indians of Marquette River- have often pointed out imaginary tracks of the fleeiing Mish-ko-tink in the sands of the lake shore, and with sobemn faces have declared that the disturbance of the eddying waters in that neighborhood was caused by the angry spirits of their drowned enemies.

The date it as uncertaint a is the resot of thes tratlitioli,;-it may hAVO bteen long -beotre the Cauadikxi 1tndianu rallied ilit the north and eame thtough Michtigan oh thir- ra-vagintg raid. ThIe Ohlppewaoo tOok. In autumn an entire family, and sometimes two or three families together, would leave the villages and wander up the smaller streams into the forests of the interior for their winter's hunt, and they would generally camp in or near a bunch of maple trees in order that they might make maple sugar in the spring.

Indian villages and camping places were almost invariably upon banks of rivers and small streams. Grand River and its tributaries always supported a large Indian population. In the palmy days of Indian supremacy there were probably hundreds, if not thousands, of Indians living within the present limits of Ottawa, Kent and Ionia counties, which was an unusual number for the territory, because in his native state an Indian required a vast amount of land to support himself and family.

From time immemorial there were large and prosperous villages at Grand Rapids and at Lowell. This was because of the excellent fishing in the river and the abundance of game in the valley. Contrary to popular belief, the Indians probably increased by their first contact with the white man. The white traders brought to the red men improved weapons and methods in fishing and hunting; the rude agriculture of the.

Indians was made more productive by the efforts of the missionaries and traders; many of the latter were more or less skilled in medicine and surgery and assisted in lessening the mortality of the Indians. Again, the traders took into the wilderness many articles which were of use to the savages in their struggles for existence, and all these things tended to increase the native population. Holding their lands by the slight tenure of possession, the Chippewas, Ottawas and Pottawattamies suffered much from the encroachments of neighboring tribes.

There were frequent inroads from the Lake Superior region by the Indians of that section. Those who were about the head of Lak6e Michigan constantly made raids into Western Michigan. The Hurons of Canada often crossed the border to hunt and fish in Michigan, but they never settled here in great numbers, although in the eastern part of Michigan there were a few Huron families and villages. The Irqoiq,fpfrpon beyond Lake Ontario, often hunted and. Those sentipmentalists who mourn because the red men have been driven from their homes and despoiled of their lands should remember that the Indians themselves obtained the country by force and retained it only as it suited their convenience and desires.

When game grew scarce land was abandoned and whoever else- occupied it was; according to Indian custom, entitled to its possession. It was the Indian law that "Might makes Right. By amalgamation and intermarriage they became so mixed' and blended that when the whites settled Western Michigan it was often difficult to ascertain to what tribe many Indians belonged, because those of one tribe so often lived in the villages of another.

After the middle of the seventeenth century the Indians of the Grand River Valley were frequently visited by the French explorers, traders and missionaries, and by them the habits of the natives were much changed. They traveled more and wandered over a larger extent of territory; they made annual visits to the French trading posts to sell furs and secure supplies; undoubtedly they lived better and had more comforts than in the years before the white men visited their country.

The traders, white hunters and trappers who first went among the Indians were a blessing to the race. Living among the red men, marrying their women and adopting their ways and habits, they introduced many simple elements of civilization and helped to develop the better part of savage life. The first white men who came among the Indians of Michigan should be numbered among the benefactors of mankind.

Long before the advent of the white man the Indians of North America had become settled and fixed in type, habit and occupation. They doubtless had lived for centuries in the samie environment and like influences. They had no mobility 'and adaptability. They could not meet changed conditions.

When the red and white races met and mingled, the red race rieained unchanged, while the white race readily adopted many; of the red men's ways and habits. The voyagweurs, frontiersmeen and. The vratile rlee tri utphed, the itnmobile rPee perished. It l9 Lasalle established a trading post at Maeklnaw tand built a foit oti t.

Joseph River. Thereafter treftch toyagettna fttittally traversed the IEastern shores of ITke Michigan aid gathered rieh cargoes of ftrs, which Were shipped to Qtebec, first by Way of Georgia Bay and the Ottawa River, and afterwards by the way of Detroit and Fontinac. These expeditions were generally in the spring when the traders would meet the Indians and buy their furs which tad been captured during the winter, and in the late summer or early autumn the Indians would visit the trading posts of St.

Joseph, Mackinaw, Saginaw and Detroit for supplies to carry with them on their winter hunts. Such was the annual routine of Indian life in Western Michigan two hundred years ago. Prench hunters and trappers visited the country, renounced civilization, married- Indian wives and became more Indian than the Indiais themselves.

Without doubt, more than a century before the settlement of the country every Indian village in the Grand River Valley had been visited by White men. The profits of the fur trade in the old Northwest were enormous. The fur companies of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries made profits which were marvelous..

In Capt. Charles langlade, of Mackinaw, whose father was a! Langlade and his braves were also present a few years after at the capture of Port William Henry, on Lake George. A grand council Was held At Grand iRapids, over three thousand Indians, were pi'esent, and every band in Western Michigan was represented. Pontia6 was Present and fired his audience with noble specimens of Indian oratory and unstudied eloquence. He contrasted the English with the French-the pride, arrogance and rapacity of the one with the suavity, generosity and justice of' the other.

But the eloquence, bravery and sagacity of Pontiac was insuffcient to expel the English. The power of the French had passed away and the days of the Indian occupation were numbered. Defeat was too -much for the proud spirit of Pontiac. He deserted Michigan, and went to live among the Illinois IndiansN Wohere he was soon after murdered. During the Pontiac war the E'nglish garrisons of both Mackinaw and St. Joseph were massacred.

At Mackinaw the soldiers were induced to attend an Ithdiem game of ball near the fort, and when thrown off their guiard they were Attacked and nearly all murdered. A few escaped after some of the most remarkable adventures in the whole history of barbarous captivities.

It is estimated that alhoiit seventy white persons Were ]killed in the Mlackinaw massacre. Joseph numbered fifteen. The Indians visited the fort apparentlly with pacifie intentions. He passed the winter on the shored of Minnesota River. The next summer he crossed the divide to 'Ylike Superior waters and then started on his return trip. He passed Sault Ste. Marie in October and reached Boston the next year. He was making arrangements for taking a large party to settle the western country when the revolution interrupted his plans, and put an end to his explorations and attempted settlements.

Years after his heirs made claim to much land in Wisconsin and Minnesota, because of his explorations and discoveries. The result was extended litigation, but the claims were not sustained by the courts. After the Pontiac war the Indian supremacy in Western Michigan was unchanged for many years.

The general policy of the English towards the Indians of the Northwest was the same as that of their predecessors. The same posts were maintained and, so far as possible, the same agents were employed. Rival fur companies contended for the trade of the country and catered for the good will of the Indians.

During the American Revolu. The grandfather of the Indian wife of Rix Robinson led a band of Indian warriors, among whom were many from the Grand River Valley, with Burgoyne through the Northern wilderness of New York to the head waters of the Hudson, but deserted the expedition before the surrender at Saratoga.

Captain Charles Langlade, during the last years of the Revolution, led an expedition by way of Detroit, the Maumee and the Wabash to recapture Vincennes for the English after it had been taken by the Americans under George Rogers Clark, but it was unsuccessful. Langlade retreated without attempting to strike a blow because his Indian followers deserted when most needed.

In the expedition were many Indians from Western Michigan. The importance and position of the West in the Revolution is not always recognized. The French alliance with the colonies in brought many of the French traders, colonists and voyageurs of the West into sympathy with the Americans and the.

Clark's success incited other expeditions. One of them, called the "Felicity," for some time cruised on Lake Michigan under the command of Captain Roberts, whose log of the voyage is now in the British Museum. His mission was to trade with the Indians and hold their allegiance to the British cause, as the French alliance and the success of Clark in the Illinois and Wabash country had a decided tendency to weaken British influence and advance American prestige about the Great Lakes.

In Spain declared war against Great Britain, and the next year on January 2, , a Spanish expedition, consisting of sixty militia and as many Indians, under the command of Captain Pierro, left St. Louis, marched across the Illinois country and captured the British post at St. Joseph, which was then located on the bank of the St. The site of the old fort is said to be near the west end of the Michigan Central railroad over the St. Joseph River at Niles, Michigan. The British garrison surrendered, were paroled and then sent away.

The Spanish soldiers held possession for a few days only and then returned to St. This expedition, although well authenticated, has not been given the prominence it deserves in American history. For a brief time Southwestern Michigan was under the Spanish flag. Michigan territory has been under four flags-not three, as is generally considered. Under the terms of the Treaty of Paris in , by which American independence was acknowledged by the nations of Europe, the territory of the Northwest was ceded to the United States, and Great Britain agreed to yield up the military posts of Michigan, but many of the treaty obligations were not observed.

The fur trade about the Great Lakes was exceedingly lucrative and British garrisons remained at Detroit and Mackinaw, so that the condition of the Northwest remained unchanged for many years. In the meantime emigrants by the thousands were coming over the mountains and settling the valley of the Ohio. The settlers were aggressive, the Indians incited by British soldiers and traders were hostile.

The United States. OeIeeratl lits! The next year the settlements of the Ohio Valley stuffeed many Ihdian depredations, and the Uhifed States sent an artmy unider General St. Clair to attack the Ihdians. Early the next morning the American forces were attacked and completely routed by the Indians. For three years afterwards the western settlers defended themselves as best they could, and then General Wayne marched another army north from Fort Washington to the rapids of the Maumee where in August, , was fought the battle of Falling Timbers, in which the Indians of the Northwest suffered a crushing defeat.

The next yeair Wayne made a treaty with the Indians at Greenville by which they ceded much land to the whites and acknowledged the stipremacy of the United States in the Northwest. Clair and Wayne. The fitst settlers of the valley sa, many Indians who, bote the iarks by the troopers of "Mad Anthony" at the battle of Falling Timbers.

There was at Indian tttil from the village at the Rapids of the Grand to Which the Indians of the valley marched to victory and to dethe Iridiar village Where Port Wayne, Indiana, now stands, over feat; It was during these years between the Revolution and the wtr df that the second getht confederation of the Indians of thB Norfthwet wAs brought dbout by the wily Tecnmseh. Hle pFrobbly never visited the Grand River Valley himself, but stit his Agefits, who saeered mtitry reerits for the warriors Wtb6.

A fo're Was erected on the banks o tile lsaltiasazo. The surrender of General Hull, at Detroit, placed the Nqrthwest posts again under the control of the British. During that war most of the Indians of Michigan espoused the cause of Great Britain, but there were a few who proved faithful friends of the Americans and were afterwards generously remembered when treaties were negotiated with their people by the United States. And Great Britain did not forget her savage allies.

From the close of the war until the Indians of Southern Michigan annually visited Maiden to receive from the British government annuities for their services during the war. At the close of the war American garrisons were again placed in the forts at St. Joseph and Mackinaw and American settlers commenced pouring into Michigan. The Indian supremacy was rapidly passing away. At the portage the British regulars were joined by several hundred Indians from Wisconsin and Michigan, among whom may have been some from the Grand River.

The British and Indians attacked and captured Prairie du Chien the next month. The American garrison surrendered, were then paroled, and went down the river to St. The first trading post established in the Grand River Valley was on the river a mile or two below the mouth of Flat River. In he married a half-breed girl-half Chippewa and half French-famed for her beauty and spirit, who had been educated in a convent at Montreal. Her father was said to be an Indian chief of the Lake Superior region and her mother a French woman.

After marriage they spent their winters at Mackinaw, which they were accustomed to leave in the early spring and travel south on the east shore of Jjake cichigau, trading with the Indians until they reached rrand! Grand below the Flat, where they spent their summers. In , in coming from Mackinaw, they met on the Lake shore about half way between Muskegon and Grand Haven a party of Pottawattamies, among whom was a young brave who, after they had gone into camp, demanded whisky from LaFlamboise.

It was refused. The Indian drew a knife and drove it into LaFlamboise's breast. The white man immediately expired and the Indian fled. LaFlamboise took the remains of her husband in a bateau to the trading post, where they were buried, and she continued the trade with the Indians of the Valley. Before her return to Mackinaw in the autumn a band of Pottawattamies brought to her the murderer and offered him to the widow for execution in conformity with Indian usage. She did not demand a life for a life, but requested that he be set free, yet forever banished from the tribe.

It was done and the Indian became an outcast. At the end of the season she returned to Mackinaw with the remains of her husband, which were buried on the Island. So successful had been Madam LaFlanmbloise in the Indian trade that she was continued as an agent for the company in place of her husband. She spent the summer of each year in the Grand River Valley and continued in trade until , when she sold her establishment to Rix Robinson.

She had become wealthy and thereafter lived at Mackinaw until , when she died. She and her husband lie buried side by side on the Island. Among the elements of civilization scattered froin old Mackinaw'among the forests of the Northwest none were more romantic or more fruitful than those planted in the Grand River Valley in the early years of the past century by the LaFlamboises. By the ordinance of the civil authority of the United States was extended over the Northwest Territory.

In Michigan was set aside as a separate territory. In Governor Hull made a treaty with the Chippewas, Ottawas, Pottawattamies, and Wyandots by which all of lower Michigan lying east and south of a line running north from the southwest corner of Lenwee county to the middle of Clinton and Shiawassee counties thence northwesterly to White Rock on Lake Huron was deeded to the United States. After the War of there. There was much intriguing and lobbying and great pressure was brought to bear upon the General Government to secure Indian lands in Michigan.

During the summer the commissioners met the Indians at Chicago, and on August 29 a treaty was completed and signed. By its terms the Indians ceded to the United States the lands south of the main stream of Grand River, with certain small reservations for individual Indians and half-breeds and a few small tracts for the use of the tribe.

In consideration of the cession the United States engaged to pay the Ottawas one thousand dollars in specie annually forever, and for a term of ten years to appropriate annually to the Ottawas the sum of fifteen hundred dollars to be expended in the support of a blacksmith, of a teacher, and of a person to give instructions in agriculture, and to purchase cattle and farming utensils.

One mile square was to be selected on the north side of Grand River, and within the Indian lands not ceded, upon which the teacher and blacksmith were to reside. Soon after the treaty was negotiated Rev. Isaac McCoy, an Indian missionary acting under the auspices of the Board of Managers of the Baptist Missionary Convention of the United States, visited Governor Cass at Detroit in behalf of the Indians, and to secure the management of the teacher and blacksmith who, according to the treaty, were to be sent to the Ottawas at Grand Rapids.

Subsequently he was appointed to superintend the United States officers sent to carry out the provisions of the treaty. Governor Cass gave elaborate instructions, dated July 16, , to McCoy, and directed that ardent spirits should, so far as possible, be kept from the Indians. Trowbridge was commissioned to make definite arrangements with the Indians for the site of a mis.

Sears and Trowbridge visited the Grand River Valley in the fall of , and selected a site, after which they returned to Fort Wayne. He found the Indians dissatisfied with the treaty and was received with anything but a hospitable welcome. The chief was not in the village and nearly all the inhabitants were in a state of intoxication by liquor obtained from some traders. McCoy at once abandoned the expedition and returned to a mission which had been established on the St.

Joseph River and which was called Carey. The next year McCoy visited some Ottawas on the Kalamazoo River and induced them to let him establish a blacksmith shop on the border between the Ottawa and Pottawattamie territories. This modified the temper of the Ottawas for a time and opened the way for further negotiations.

In November, , McCoy, with several companions, left the St. Joseph River for a second visit to the Rapids of the Grand River. On reaching the border of the Ottawa country they found that the blacksmith shop built the preceding year had been burned by the Indians, who still felt unfriendly to the whites because of the Chicago treaty.

On November 27 they reached Gun Lake, and camped upon its banks. The next day they were visited by Noonday, the Ottawa Chief of the Indian village at the Rapids, who, with some followers, was camping on the opposite side of the lake. McCoy found that Noonday was desirous of having a mission established at the Rapids, and the next day both the whites and the Indians raised camp and proceeded together towards Grand Rapids. On December 1 the River was reached and crossed. The same day McCoy selected a site for a mission, which was located just south of what is now the corner of West Bridge and Front streets.

The selection was afterwards approved by Governor Cass and confirmed by the Secretary of War. The site selected two years before by Sears and Trowbridge is supposed to have been several miles up the River, but the exact spot chosen is now unknown. The next day McCoy started on his return to the St. Joseph River, and was accompanied a portion of the way by Noonday. The next spring Mr. Polke, teacher, a blacksmith, and two or three others were sent to the Rapiis by McCoy to open the mission, but they found a great majority.

Soon afterward Polke returned to the Rapids and found a great change in the sentiment of the Indians. They expressed regret for their tormer action and wished to have the mission at once established. In September, , farming utensils, mechanical tools and provisions were sent by boat down the St.

Joseph River, along the Lake shore and up Grand River to the Rapids, while McCoy, with several assistants, traveled overland to the same place. Permanent log buidings were at once erected on the site chosen the year before and the mission was fully established. When the mission was founded there were two Indian villages at the Rapids. One was situated along the west side of the River, from West Bridge street north; the other was in the neighborhood of what is now West Fulton street, with its center near the corner of Watson street and West Broadway.

The south village was the larger and numbered three hundred inhabitants or more. It was presided over by a chief named Mex-ci-ne-ne, or the Wampum-man. He was an eloquent speaker and a man of influence among his people. His wife was a daughter of Noonday. The Indian Commissioners found him wary in negotiations and slow to accept their overtures. He was of an aristocratic, haughty disposition and was something of a dandy in the matter of dress. While at Washington to negotiate the treaty of he was presented by President Jackson with a suit of new clothes, of which he was very proud, and with it insisted upon having a high hat with a mourning badge.

He was among the foremost of his people to adopt the white man's ways. His habits were good and he lived and died in the Catholic faith. In the year his existence was terminated by a sudden illness and his funeral was attended by nearly every citizen of Grand Rapids, white as well as red. Another Indian chief living at the lower village was Muck-i-ta-oska, or Black-skin, who in his early years was an active foe of the Americans.

He fought with the British in the War of , and is said to have been the leader of the bawd who set fire to the village of Puff. He was happy in his domestic relations and a man of excellent habits. Old settlers often spoke of his fine physique. Fully six feet tall, well-proportioned and a noble looking man, he was well advanced in years when the Grand River Valley was first visited by American settlers. He died at Gull Prairie in , and no stone slab marks his grave.

He also fought with the British during the War of Noonday, was a short, dumpy, unassuming lady of the old school. Nature had not seen fit to make her very attractive by the bewitching, fascinating charms of personal beauty; and what little there might have been of feminine comeliness in her features had been sadly marred by an ugly scar upon the left side of her face. He was the husband of three wives and treated each with the respect and consideration due the consort of a mighty chief, He had a family of twenty-two children.

Aside from the number of his wives, his morals were good. In personal appearance he was not the equal of his neighbors. He was a little below medium height and inclined to corpulency. In his last days he become a vagrant and a drunkard. His village was first near the junction of Flat and Grand Rivers and was one of the largest in the valley. It numbered three hundred inhabitants and upwards.

In later days it was moved up Flat River to the upper part of the present village of Lowell. Although of small stature, he was a man of commanding influence with his tribe. He was on the most friendly terms with the whites, visited Washington, and was one of the leading spirits in the treaty of Up the Thornapple, near what is now Whitneyville, there was the Caswon band of Indians, numbering about forty.

Between the Thornapple River and the Rapids there were a few families who were under the authority of Canote, a chief who stood high in the estimation of the early settlers. Below the Rapids, at the mouth of. Crockery Creek, was a small Indian village, of which Sag-e-nish, or. As his name implied he was a great friend of the white man.

In Ionia county there were two Indian villages of importance on Grand River. One was at Lyons, where the prairie was used as a cornfield for ages, and the other was near the mouth of the Lookingglass River. The latter was called Mis-she-min-o-kon, or the Apple Field. It was abandoned by the Indians at an early day. Near Lansing chief Okemos had a village. He was a nephew of the Great Pontiac. Among the Indians of the valley there were other chiefs than those already mentioned.

There was Pa-moska, a leading chief whose home was many times changed, but who generally lived in the villages down the River, at Crockery Creek and Battle Point. There were Ke-way-coosh-cum, or Long Nose, and Wa-ba-sis, both of whom fell victims to Indian vengeance for the part they took in the treaties with the Whites. The former was killed in a drunken brawl by an Indian named Was-o-ge-naw.

Each had conme to Grand Rapids to receive his annual stipend on payment day and, having been paid, became intoxicated. They were sitting on the bank of the River, near the mouth of Coldbrook Creek, when a dispute arose relative to the treaty and Was-o-ge-naw seized a club and felled his victim to the earth with a blow that killed him on the spot. The matter was not investigated by the officers of the law because it was considered that he was executed in accordance with the Indian customs and ideas of justice.

Because of the prominent part he took in the treaties Wa-ba-sis was exiled from his tribe. For many years he lived on the banks of a small lake in the northern part of Kent county. In an unguarded moment he was induced by his enemies to partake in a corn feast at Plainfield, where he was made drunk and then murdered.

He was buried near where now is the Plainfield bridge. The head of the body was left above the ground, and food and tobacco for many weeks were daily placed on the grave for the nourishment of his spirit on its journey to the happy hunting ground. There is a tradition that Wa-ba-sis buried on the banks of the lake which bears his name a large amount of gold received by him from the whites for aiding them in the treaty of , but it.

An aged chart done in charcoal was fwnd in a hollow tree years after the chief's death. The outline of the lake was faithfully reproduced and near the east end was a cross marked "treasure. To his children Wa-ba-sis used to say that some day the hated white man would find the riches which he spent so many years in acquiring. Near Holland there was a band of Indians under a chief named Wakazoo. The Holland Indians early made considerable advance in civilization.

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David bettinghaus southside bank peoria il There was much intriguing and lobbying and great pressure was brought to bear upon the General Government to tsv bettingen spielplan berliner Indian lands in Michigan. Levake, William Lasley, Geo. Hn Hn. They gathered wild berries and fruits in their season, and these, as well as game, furs, dressed deer skin and moccasins, they were wont to "swap" for flour, salt, tobacco, ammunition, sugar, blankets, and such other articles as they desired-not forgetting "fire-water" if that was obtainable and seldom was it lacking. The annual payments which they were to receive under the treaty were made at Grand Rapids and continud for more than twenty years.

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As Building and Ground Maintenance Coordinator Chris is responsible for maintaining and supervising our beautiful Peoria facilities inside and out and in addition he makes deliveries for our staff and clients. He also held positions as a construction laborer and delivery driver for an office supply company for 8 years. Outside of work, Chris enjoys spending time with his wife and working on his yard, Man Cave and garage. He loves having all 3 of his children home for family get togethers.

Chris and his wife travel to Michigan to see their oldest son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren as often as they can. He was also elected to a four-year term serving as a trustee for the Village of Peoria Heights. Wayne received his Bachelor of Science degree from Bradley University. John V. During the course of his career he held leadership positions in many different areas including Commercial Banking, Private Banking, Personal Trust and Investments, Marketing, Strategic Planning and Acquisitions.

He was appointed President of Northern's Midwest Region in , which included direct oversight of the Bank's 16 locations in the Chicago area, as well as offices in St. John's passion and expertise regarding family-owned businesses was nurtured over many years of working closely with Northern's key Personal Trust and Middle Market business clients.

Most of these client families derived their wealth through the success of a family business enterprise. Because of Northern's long history of serving successful families, John was afforded important insights relating to multigenerational family businesses in addition to first generation owners and wealth creators. Virginia Johnson Pillman is president of Virginia M. Virginia received her Bachelor of Science degree with highest honors from Purdue University and her master in business administration with honors in finance from the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University.

David J. Vaughan, Jr. He has held numerous leadership roles in his more than 25 years of medical practice, including Chairman of the Departments of Urology at both Florida Hospital and Winter Park Hospital. David has also served as managing partner for his fifteen physician urology practice for ten years. He has been named one of the top physicians in Central Florida for the past ten years.

Mike Joined Caterpillar as an accountant in Early in his career he held a number of staff and supervisory accounting positions at Caterpillar. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: ptimko dviinc. His background also includes experience in Investment Analyst and Relationship Specialist roles.

As a Portfolio manager in the Winter Park, Florida office, Pierce is responsible for the daily investment management of client portfolios, providing analyst coverage on specific industry groups, and participating as a member of DVI's Investment Committee.

Pierce and his wife Brittany have two daughters, Aubrey and Sylvie, and you can often find them at Disney or exploring new cities together. He also enjoys cheering on his favorite football teams, walking with his two Labradors, and staying active. His last big achievement was running a marathon, and someday plans to complete his first triathlon.

Firm Tenure: Since P: E: msprout dviinc. Maryann is a lifelong Peoria resident and a graduate of Illinois Central College. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: bsalmon dviinc. She provides oversight of day-to day operations and financial reporting.

Beth also proactively evaluates the performance of the firm in meeting operating and strategic objectives, identifying efficiency issues and proposing solutions. Beth has also been appointed as the Board secretary to ensure the proper governance framework is fulfilled. Prior to joining DVI, Beth worked in the education, healthcare, information services and public accounting industries.

Beth graduated with a Bachelors of Business Administration degree from St. She is a Certified Public Accountant. As a life-long resident of the Peoria area and a very active member of the community, when Beth is not in the office, she enjoys family time with her husband Matt and their four daughters and families. She loves to travel, is an avid reader and enjoys concerts and a myriad of outdoor activities.

He is also a member of the bank's Board of Directors. Prior to joining Morton Community Bank, Dirk spent eighteen years with Caterpillar in various accounting and finance roles, primarily in the Peoria, IL area but also including assignments at Cat Financial in Nashville, TN and with a business unit in Europe. Before Caterpillar he spent seven years with Price Waterhouse. His last position there was lead audit manager for the Caterpillar engagement.

He has also earned his Certified Public Accountant designation. Dirk resides in Morton, IL with his wife. They have two grown daughters. Supporting the community, he currently serves on the Unity Point — Methodist Health Services Corporation and Pekin Hospital boards and in the past has served on the Accounting Advisory Board of his alma mater. Prior to working for Morton Community Bank, Andy was a longtime partner at a prominent Peoria law firm and served Morton Community Bank as his primary client.

He is also a longstanding member of Morton Rotary. Andy earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Illinois , Senior Honorary and earned his law degree from Boston University School of Law , cum laude where he won the Albers Moot Court Competition with final arguments before a panel which included Justice Stephen G. Breyer of the United States Supreme Court.

Firm Tenure: Since P: E: gmaxey dviinc. He also assists with our quantitative research initiatives and serves as a Secondary Equity Trader on our trading desk. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: cforrest dviinc. Candace is a graduate of the University of Central Florida with a bachelor's degree in Finance. With over 10 years of experience, she has assembled a broad set of skills in the wealth management industry.

As a Client Services Associate, Candace provides support to the Winter Park Advisory Team and is responsible for assisting with our clients' daily service needs, including client documentation, new account setups, asset transfers and cash management requests.

In addition, she handles the front desk and office administration in our Winter Park Office: greeting clients and setting up for client meetings. Candace and her husband Danny stay busy with their son and daughter, Dylan and Ella, and you can often find them outdoors doing something water related such as going to the beach or boating on the lake with their family. They also enjoy taking their kids to visit Walt Disney World where they hold annual passes.

Firm Tenure: Since P: E: mflaherty dviinc. Mike Flaherty brings to DVI over 15 years of experience in the financial service and insurance industries, both as a financial advisor and operations manager. He has proven himself as an effective leader in managing client relationships, and has developed expertise in financial planning.

As a Relationship Manager, Mike's responsibilities include the oversight and coordination of client accounts and the delivery of the DVI Service Model to our clients. In addition, Mike is helping to expand our growing financial planning and ancillary services, while assisting our clients in achieving their financial goals.

In his free time Mike loves to travel. He enjoys scuba diving, playing golf and is an avid runner. He enjoys spending time with his family and their two dogs and going to Chicago to cheer for the Cubs, Bears and Blackhawks. Prior to being named CEO, Mr. Kevin has demonstrated over his career at OSF a strength in strategic execution and a no nonsense managerial style, highly reliant on employee accountability. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: aapa dviinc.

Amy came to DVI in with 8 years of experience in the financial services industry. In addition to her investment accounting experience, Amy has process change and reporting experience along with a Trust Banking and Client Service background. As an Investment Accountant, Amy's primary responsibilities include reconciling internal and external investment accounting systems, researching and reconciling cost basis and market values for clients, reconciling proxy votes and calculating monthly returns for composites.

Amy is an avid traveler and her recent favorite destination spots are the Galapagos Islands and Thailand. She also enjoys softball, pheasant hunting and creating her own greeting cards. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: jhanshaw dviinc. As the IT Manager and Database Administrator, Jeremy's primary responsibilities include analyzing complex business needs presented by DVI Associates and recommending technical solutions, providing expertise and assisting in the oversight and administration of all internal databases and overseeing all systems designed to protect the security of assets and information of the firm.

Jeremy has done a lot of coding as a hobby and is familiar with many languages. In his free time, Jeremy likes to play lead on electric guitar. Whenever possible Jeremy loves to travel the US and world with his wife and son.

Their favorite trip was to Machu Picchu in Peru. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: mzippay dviinc. Mitch received his Bachelor of Science from Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and has since gained seven years of accounting experience in a variety of industries. His experience spans from payroll and capital budgets to complex accounting analysis and preparing annual financial statement disclosures.

At DVI, Mitch oversees the accounting department. He manages the day-to-day critical functions of payroll, accounts payable and accounts receivable, as well as creates internal accounting policies and procedures and prepares monthly forecasts and yearly budgets.

Mitch and his wife, Jessie, live in Morton and have one daughter, Lilah. In his spare time, Mitch enjoys playing golf, spending time with family and friends, and traveling. Thus far, his favorite destination has been the Island of Jamaica. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: nheffelbower dviinc. Nate joined DVI in with over 12 years of client service experience. In addition to performing client services functions, as the Client Services Supervisor, Nate is responsible for the oversight of all client service processes, training and development, and supervision of the CSAs.

In his free time, Nate enjoys watching college football, spending time with family, and traveling. Thus far, his favorite destination has been the Dominican Republic. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: mkoury dviinc. Her years of experience in customer and strategic partner relations were the ideal preparation for her role as Administrative Client Services Associate.

As an Administrative Client Services Associate, Mary is responsible for responsible for the day to day support of the Client Services department and assisting with administrative duties in support of DVI Consulting.

In her free time she enjoys spending time with her husband Sam, rock climbing at First Ascent, reading a good book outside, and catching up with friends and family. Firm Tenure: Since P: E: shumphrey dviinc.

Sophia came to DVI with over 26 years of experience in the financial services industry, spending 12 years acting as liaison between three different advisor teams and their clients, all while providing the highest level of client service.

From the very start, it was immediately clear, that Sophia cares immensely about building and deepening the relationships with our clients. As a Client Services Associate, Sophia is responsible for the day-to-day support of our Relationship Managers as well as assisting with administrative duties in our Winter Park office. While firm founder, David J. Vaughan would spend many of his winters in Florida, it was actually his son David J. Vaughan Jr. With a growing local team and a business model that embraces the latest HD video conferencing technology, DVI investment professionals are able to take full advantage of the resources, experience and technical expertise of our personnel located in our Central Illinois office.

Today, DVI maintains a national practice providing a full suite of investment advisory and wealth management services to both high net worth individuals and institutional clients. Skip to main content. Client Log-in. Our Team Senior Leadership. David Vaughan Will Williams. Affiliations Advanced Medical Transport, Inc.

Brian A. Patrick J. Todd M. Stephen K. Michael A. Deanna M. Stephanie A. Jeffrey J. Margaret L. Meghan J. Dalton M. Amy M. Anne M. Lisa C. Christopher G. Wayne E. Michael L. Activist Chama St. Louis, Caterpillar account manager Andres Diaz, the Rev. Ardis announced earlier this year he wouldn't seek a fifth consecutive term for the office he's held since Each Peoria City Council district seat also is contested. Incumbent councilman Tim Riggenbach filed his paperwork to run for re-election in the 3rd District on the last day.

He faces Gale Thetford, who represented the area on the council from , and Lawrence Maushard, an East Bluff activist. Incumbent City Clerk Beth Ball isn't running for re-election. David Beck, Patrick Risen, Stephen Morris, and Brook Sommerville will run for the city treasurer's job after incumbent Patrick Nichting opted not to run for another term. Wednesday, Dec. The top two vote-getters in races with more than two candidates filed will move onto the April general election. There's no subscription fee to listen or read our stories.

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The Debtors, in their business judgment, and after review of all bids submitted, will determine the proposed transaction or transactions that generate the maximum value for their estates. The Debtors may adopt rules for the Auction that will promote the goals of the Auction process and that are not inconsistent with any of the provisions of the Bidding Procedures.

Only bidders who submit bids in accordance with the Bidding Procedures will be allowed to attend the Auction. Coles and Bonni G. Fife and Shai Y. All persons and entities are urged to read the Bidding Procedures Order, when entered, and the provisions thereof carefully. To the extent that this notice is inconsistent with the Bidding Procedures Order, the terms of the Bidding Procedures Order shall govern. Create an Account or Login to Existing Account. Please enter your email to create an account or sign-in to your existing account: We'll never share your email with anyone else.

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